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” An educational website developed by National Geographic and PBS will provide information about elephants and the illicit trade that is undermining their future.Funding for “Battle for the Elephants” is provided by David H. The film tells the ultimate wildlife story — how the Earth’s most charismatic and majestic land animal today faces market forces driving the value of its tusks to levels once reserved for precious metals.In China, Christy explores the thriving industry of luxury goods made from ivory and the ancient cultural tradition of ivory carving.

By 1913, as the United States consumed more than 200 tons of ivory a year, only 10 million elephants remained.At the Amboseli Trust for Elephants in Kenya, Deputy Director Soila Sayialel explains how the elephants’ highly evolved society, keen intelligence and ability to communicate across vast distances and to love, remember and even to mourn, are far more complex than ever imagined.She also describes how the rise of poaching has caused disturbing changes in elephant behavior, including increased agitation, stress and aggression in the presence of humans.Observing a master carver in China painstakingly create a priceless piece of art from ivory, Christy acknowledges the exquisite beauty of the craft and the deep importance of ivory in Chinese culture and tradition.However, he poses the central question: “Is this craft or this species more valuable?

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